Speech Development Blog

Is it true that children living in bilingual families start talking later?

The answer is, sometimes. What is important to remember, however, is that the advantage of knowing two languages outweighs the small disadvantage of delayed speech, especially since the delay is only temporary.  There is often a slight delay in the speech and language development of both languages in children living in a bilingual household. Over time, though, bilingual children often catch up to their peers and have the added benefit of communicating in two different languages with proficiency. Speaking two different languages offers big benefits even though it can cause your child to start talking a bit later.

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Stuttering

Many young kids go through a stage between the ages of 2 and 5 when they stutter, repeating certain syllables, words or phrases, prolonging them, or stopping, making no sound except for certain sounds and syllables. In many cases, stuttering usually goes away on its own by the age of 5. While there is no cure for stuttering, speech therapy can be an effective way for your child to overcome it.

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Speech Disorder or Speech Delay?

What is the Difference Between a Language Disorder and a Language Delay?

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How to Help Your Shy Child

If your preschooler is attached to your hip at your every move, try these tips on how you can help your shy child gain some independence and confidence.

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Emergent Reading Skills: Preliteracy Skills to Teach Your Child

A child’s preliteracy period is about learning to read. Unlike when they are learning to talk, they do not come ready to read, and they will need your help in learning about letters, words, and books. 

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What You Need to Know About Pragmatic Language and Social Skills

Pragmatic language, commonly referred to as social skills, refers to the verbal and non-verbal rules that dictate our social interactions. Those rules vary greatly across cultures, but they are something all of us use every day. Social interaction can include a number of gestures, from a head nod to eye contact; we do not need to say anything verbally to use social skills. Most of us go about our daily lives and easily make the right decisions when it comes to socially interacting with one another, but for those with a social skills problem, this can be painfully difficult.

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Techniques that Encourage Language Development

Most of you use the following techniques while interacting with your babies and toddlers without realizing that what you’re doing is a certain technique. Some of these are indirect, meaning that there is no specific requesting of a response, and some of these are direct, which is a way of encouraging language and requesting that children imitate words or sounds.

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5 Things You Need to Know About Your Toddler’s Speech Development

As parents, we always have questions about our children’s development. What is normal? How can I help my child talk? Here are a few things I think every parent should know about speech and language development in toddlers:

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Help Your Child Become the Best Talker in Town

Up until your child is around three years old, having a conversation with your toddler has been a one sided affair. At the age of two or three, kids start picking up words faster than you can say “chatterbox”. By the age of 2, most children know between 20 to 200 words and by the age of 3, that number go up to about 1,000!

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A Parents First Steps for Addressing Children's Speech Disorders


Are you concerned about whether your child might have a speech or language problem? A speech pathologist will be able to pinpoint the cause and tailor a program to your child’s needs.

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