Speech Development Blog

Is it true that children living in bilingual families start talking later?

The answer is, sometimes. What is important to remember, however, is that the advantage of knowing two languages outweighs the small disadvantage of delayed speech, especially since the delay is only temporary.  There is often a slight delay in the speech and language development of both languages in children living in a bilingual household. Over time, though, bilingual children often catch up to their peers and have the added benefit of communicating in two different languages with proficiency. Speaking two different languages offers big benefits even though it can cause your child to start talking a bit later.

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How to Help Your Shy Child

If your preschooler is attached to your hip at your every move, try these tips on how you can help your shy child gain some independence and confidence.

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Emergent Reading Skills: Preliteracy Skills to Teach Your Child

A child’s preliteracy period is about learning to read. Unlike when they are learning to talk, they do not come ready to read, and they will need your help in learning about letters, words, and books. 

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Techniques that Encourage Language Development

Most of you use the following techniques while interacting with your babies and toddlers without realizing that what you’re doing is a certain technique. Some of these are indirect, meaning that there is no specific requesting of a response, and some of these are direct, which is a way of encouraging language and requesting that children imitate words or sounds.

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Toddler Books for Big Emotional Milestones

Not only do books help your little toddler learn new vocabulary, they can also help with some of the big emotional milestones that they may encounter. Below are a list of suggested books that will help your tiny tot through some big changes and some healthy childhood development.

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Top 10 Tips to Improve Speech & Communication Skills

Speech therapy doesn’t stop when your child comes home. Speech therapy should be an ongoing, continuous practice and that includes inside the home. By continuing what your child is learning in speech therapy at home on a daily basis, you will not only see faster results, but it will also make your child more confident in what he is learning and accomplishing.

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Augmentative and Alternative Communication Therapy for Deaf Children

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Apps for Autistic Children

I recently ran across an article from the NY Times on how the Apple iPad has been portrayed as a minor miracle on how it can help children with autism learn quickly. Its research has found that teachers, parents, and therapists can attest to the profound difference that iPad, Android, and iPhone apps can help autistic children develop skills. Different apps have been found to conquer different areas that autistic children suffer from such as not speaking, language delays, stressful social situations, fine motor skills, writing, and manipulating small objects. I thought I would compose a list of free apps, that don’t contain ads, no in app purchases, no lite versions and that are the most engaging. These apps are great for trying to incorporate speech therapy into your home on a day to day basis. Children can play with these in the car, at the grocery store, or even during quiet time.

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Can a Speech Pathologist (Therapist) help my child?

Many people do not realize just how many disorders or conditions that a speech pathologist can treat. These are some general categories and specific conditions that can benefit from speech therapy. While this is by no means a complete list, it should give you a good idea of the many children that can be helped by a speech language pathologist.

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Speech Therapy Ideas for Middle School Autistic Children

Once children reach the middle school and high school age, autism will become even more challenging as social pressures become even more intense. The focus in working with middle school and high school children that are on the autism spectrum should be non-verbal peer interactions and life skills that the child will need after school. Here are some speech therapy ideas that you can try in your approach::

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