Speech Development Blog

Is it true that children living in bilingual families start talking later?

The answer is, sometimes. What is important to remember, however, is that the advantage of knowing two languages outweighs the small disadvantage of delayed speech, especially since the delay is only temporary.  There is often a slight delay in the speech and language development of both languages in children living in a bilingual household. Over time, though, bilingual children often catch up to their peers and have the added benefit of communicating in two different languages with proficiency. Speaking two different languages offers big benefits even though it can cause your child to start talking a bit later.

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Stuttering

Many young kids go through a stage between the ages of 2 and 5 when they stutter, repeating certain syllables, words or phrases, prolonging them, or stopping, making no sound except for certain sounds and syllables. In many cases, stuttering usually goes away on its own by the age of 5. While there is no cure for stuttering, speech therapy can be an effective way for your child to overcome it.

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Children's Speech Development: Ages 8-9

Children between the ages of 7 to 8 are faced with language demands of a school environment. The focus of this age group is to work on developing an understanding of formal and informal speech and language skills. Speech and language milestones are divided into six different categories and are all equally important. If you feel that your child is struggling in any of these six categories, speak to your child’s teacher, pediatrician, or a speech pathologist to assess what the issue might be.

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What You Need to Know About Pragmatic Language and Social Skills

Pragmatic language, commonly referred to as social skills, refers to the verbal and non-verbal rules that dictate our social interactions. Those rules vary greatly across cultures, but they are something all of us use every day. Social interaction can include a number of gestures, from a head nod to eye contact; we do not need to say anything verbally to use social skills. Most of us go about our daily lives and easily make the right decisions when it comes to socially interacting with one another, but for those with a social skills problem, this can be painfully difficult.

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As a Working Mom, How Can I Help My Toddler Develop Her Language Skills?

A lot of moms can really relate to this dilemma: you are a working mom who might not be home as much as you’d like to be and worry about your child not developing his or her language skills as fast as their peers. First make sure your child’s daytime routine is a healthy, nurturing one that encourages development. Find a great preschool and daycare with a low teacher to child ratio that can provide excellent opportunities for your child to listen, imitate, and practice newly developing speech skills. It is also a good idea to make sure that your child isn’t the oldest child there. By surrounding your child with slightly older children, they will be able to serve as good speaking models and partners.

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How can I help my toddler put his thoughts into sentences?

It is perfectly normal for toddler’s to struggle with their new language skills. The best way to help your toddler put his thoughts into sentences is to show him how those sentences should sound. For instance, if your child comes up to you with an unopened bag of cookies and says, “Mommy! You open, you open…,” the most helpful thing would be to reply with a model of the phrase he is trying to say like “Mommy” (wait for him to imitate) “Help me please” (wait for him to imitate).

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A Parents First Steps for Addressing Children's Speech Disorders


Are you concerned about whether your child might have a speech or language problem? A speech pathologist will be able to pinpoint the cause and tailor a program to your child’s needs.

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How to Improve Your Toddler's Speech Development & Vocabulary

Language development soars at this age as children are using words to express their thoughts and feelings. Language and literacy skills continue to build on each other in a child’s third year. In fact, by the age of 3 the size of a child’s vocabulary is related to later reading skills.

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No Speech Therapy, What is a Parent Supposed To Do?

What are parents supposed to do when they are refused speech therapy services for their child?  I am asked this question weekly by families all across the United States.  The most recent question was asked by a family who has a 5 year old son who has not only articulation issues, but language and stuttering issues as well.  This is so frustrating for the parents and the child, but also the Speech Language Pathologists.

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Speech Therapy Can Help Children with ADHD!

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