Speech Development Blog

Is it true that children living in bilingual families start talking later?

The answer is, sometimes. What is important to remember, however, is that the advantage of knowing two languages outweighs the small disadvantage of delayed speech, especially since the delay is only temporary.  There is often a slight delay in the speech and language development of both languages in children living in a bilingual household. Over time, though, bilingual children often catch up to their peers and have the added benefit of communicating in two different languages with proficiency. Speaking two different languages offers big benefits even though it can cause your child to start talking a bit later.

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What is Receptive Language Disorder?

Receptive Language Disorder is also known as mixed Receptive Language Disorder. This is primarily a learning disability that affects either the expression or understanding of language or both. This disorder affects nearly 3-5% of all children. Children with Receptive Language Disorder may find difficulty in following directions, following a schedule and/or handling transistions from one activity to another.  As they get older, they may need directions to be written down on paper. Children may also have difficulties in social settings, since they have trouble expressing themselves normally and have trouble processing what is being said. It is important to understand that a diagnosis of Receptive Language Disorder does not relate to your child’s intelligence. In fact, children that are diagnosed with Receptive Language Disorder have an above average IQ compared to others.

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Emergent Reading Skills: Preliteracy Skills to Teach Your Child

A child’s preliteracy period is about learning to read. Unlike when they are learning to talk, they do not come ready to read, and they will need your help in learning about letters, words, and books. 

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As a Working Mom, How Can I Help My Toddler Develop Her Language Skills?

A lot of moms can really relate to this dilemma: you are a working mom who might not be home as much as you’d like to be and worry about your child not developing his or her language skills as fast as their peers. First make sure your child’s daytime routine is a healthy, nurturing one that encourages development. Find a great preschool and daycare with a low teacher to child ratio that can provide excellent opportunities for your child to listen, imitate, and practice newly developing speech skills. It is also a good idea to make sure that your child isn’t the oldest child there. By surrounding your child with slightly older children, they will be able to serve as good speaking models and partners.

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How can I help my toddler put his thoughts into sentences?

It is perfectly normal for toddler’s to struggle with their new language skills. The best way to help your toddler put his thoughts into sentences is to show him how those sentences should sound. For instance, if your child comes up to you with an unopened bag of cookies and says, “Mommy! You open, you open…,” the most helpful thing would be to reply with a model of the phrase he is trying to say like “Mommy” (wait for him to imitate) “Help me please” (wait for him to imitate).

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A Parents First Steps for Addressing Children's Speech Disorders


Are you concerned about whether your child might have a speech or language problem? A speech pathologist will be able to pinpoint the cause and tailor a program to your child’s needs.

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Top 10 Tips to Improve Speech & Communication Skills

Speech therapy doesn’t stop when your child comes home. Speech therapy should be an ongoing, continuous practice and that includes inside the home. By continuing what your child is learning in speech therapy at home on a daily basis, you will not only see faster results, but it will also make your child more confident in what he is learning and accomplishing.

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Dyslexia: A Language Based Learning Disability

Language based learning disabilities are problems with age appropriate reading, spelling, or writing. It is important to note that this disorder is not about how smart a child is. Most children who are diagnosed with a language based learning disability have average to superior intelligence.

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Speech Therapy Apps

Technology has become part of our daily lives as well as our children’s lives. Technology is so amazing in that iPad and iPhone application developers have created motivating apps that target many speech and language problems that some children face. SpeechTails is also compatible with the iPad and can be used when on the go as well. While there are literally hundreds of apps out there, here are a few apps that help target some specific speech problems such as improving or maintaining vocabulary, articulation, and pragmatic and language skills.

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Dyslexia and Speech Development

Dyslexia is a type of specific learning difficulty in which a child has difficulties with language and words. The most common characteristic of dyslexia is that the child has difficulty reading and spelling for no apparent reason. Your child might be intelligent and able to achieve well in other areas and subjects but is unable to read at the expected level. Spelling, comprehension, reading, and identification of words are all common problems that children with dyslexia face. It is important to acknowledge that dyslexia is not a symptom of low intelligence and, in fact, many highly intelligent and creative people such as Leonardo da Vinci and Thomas Edison both struggled with dyslexia.

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