Speech Development Blog

Apraxia of Speech - HELP!

Childhood Apraxia of Speech is a motor speech disorder. Children with childhood apraxia of speech have problems saying sounds, syllables, and words. This happens when the brain has problems planning to move the body parts (e.g., lips, jaw, tongue) needed for speech. The child knows what he/she wants to say but is unable to due to the brain’s difficulties in coordinating the muscle movements necessary to make those sounds and say those words.

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What is Receptive Language Disorder?

Receptive Language Disorder is also known as mixed Receptive Language Disorder. This is primarily a learning disability that affects either the expression or understanding of language or both. This disorder affects nearly 3-5% of all children. Children with Receptive Language Disorder may find difficulty in following directions, following a schedule and/or handling transistions from one activity to another.  As they get older, they may need directions to be written down on paper. Children may also have difficulties in social settings, since they have trouble expressing themselves normally and have trouble processing what is being said. It is important to understand that a diagnosis of Receptive Language Disorder does not relate to your child’s intelligence. In fact, children that are diagnosed with Receptive Language Disorder have an above average IQ compared to others.

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Speech Disorder or Speech Delay?

What is the Difference Between a Language Disorder and a Language Delay?

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Is Online Speech Therapy Right for My Child?

A misconception exists that speech pathologists only treat children who have difficulty producing specific sounds or those that stutter. Although these are some of the issues that get addressed with speech therapy, speech pathologists also assess and treat a large range of speech and language disorders. Disorders include some of the following: speech and language phonology, language, executive function, voice, fluency, and social language. But is online speech therapy right for my child?

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8 Signs Your Child is Speech Delayed

All parents eagerly wait for their baby’s first words. However, while every child learns at his or her own pace, it is important to be familiar with general speech milestones and language development. These milestones build on one another, giving children a path for developing cognition, social interaction, motor coordination, and adaptive skills. If you're concerned that your child is speech delayed, take a look at the typical milestones for speech development. Here are the top 8 signs that your child may have an issue with speech:

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Children's Speech Development: Ages 8-9

Children between the ages of 7 to 8 are faced with language demands of a school environment. The focus of this age group is to work on developing an understanding of formal and informal speech and language skills. Speech and language milestones are divided into six different categories and are all equally important. If you feel that your child is struggling in any of these six categories, speak to your child’s teacher, pediatrician, or a speech pathologist to assess what the issue might be.

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How to Get Your Toddler Talking

While many toddlers love to talk, some are a little more on the quiet side. Here are six ways to engage your toddler in conversation, and get them talking:

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Techniques that Encourage Language Development

Most of you use the following techniques while interacting with your babies and toddlers without realizing that what you’re doing is a certain technique. Some of these are indirect, meaning that there is no specific requesting of a response, and some of these are direct, which is a way of encouraging language and requesting that children imitate words or sounds.

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Speech Therapy Sessions with Children of Varying Ages: Activity Suggestions that Parents Can Draw From

While some speech pathologists specialize in one age group, such as preschool, elementary age children, adolescents, etc., most pediatric Speech Language Pathologists, especially those that work in a rehab clinic or school settings, work with children of varying ages and abilities. As a parent, you can take a page from their book as well! Below are some tips and ideas on how to work with school age children of different ages and abilities.

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Language Disorders and a Mistake Parents Make

If “language is the means by which all other subjects are pursued,” as J. Boyer from the Center for Advancement of Teaching and Learning puts it, language disorders can impact so many areas of one’s life, and if left untreated, can be devastating.

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